Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SCALE: When Everyone Wins

Filed under
Linux

On the second day of SCALE yesterday, the first keynote was delivered by Dan Kegel of Google. The presentation was entitled "Why Won't Johnny Run Linux?" and preceded to list all of the various areas that need improvement, in Kegel's opinion, in the Linux operating system. There was nothing on Kegel's list we haven't heard before: lack of commercial applications, lack of consistency with libraries and packaging, Microsoft application integration problems, and the usual assortment of hardware and software compatibility issues.

Now I was pretty sure at the time that Kegel was going to list all of these concerns and then move into some form of solution set. You know the kind that I mean: "here's how we can change the future." It's a bit trite, but it's a worthy play. Heck, I've written columns with that methodology myself.

Instead, that was it. No solutions, not even a rally for the future. It was to say the least, a bit disappointing. So when the Q&A started, the audience let fly with counterpoints on why Kegel was a being pessimistic.

Full Article

In related news:

A software engineer at Google is urging the open source community to develop more applications for desktops and laptops, because he says the workforce is increasingly on the move.

In a keynote address at the Fourth Annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 4x) in Los Angeles, Google's Dan Kegel outlined some challenges for greater adoption of Linux.

"One in three companies use open source applications on the desktop but market share remains tiny," he said at the event Sunday. "General market share for desktop and laptops that run Linux in the United States is between 1 percent and 2 percent."

Laptops pose new challenges, Kegel said during the keynote.

Call issued for more mobile Linux apps.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE

  • KDE's Project Neon Begins Publishing Daily Wayland Images
    KDE -- KDE's Project Neon has begun publishing daily images of the latest KDE Plasma stack powered atop Wayland rather than the X.Org Server. Jonathan Riddell passed along word that daily ISOs are now being spun of the freshest KDE development code with KWin acting as a Wayland compositor. The OS base is still Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.
  • The Qt Company's Qt Start-Up
    The Qt Company is proud to offer a new version of the Qt for Application Development package called Qt Start-Up, the company's C++-based framework of libraries and tools that enables the development of powerful, interactive and cross-platform applications and devices. Now used by around one million developers worldwide, the Qt Company seeks to expand its user base by targeting smaller enterprises.

Linux 4.5.3

I'm announcing the release of the 4.5.3 kernel. All users of the 4.5 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.5.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.5.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... thanks, greg k-h Read more Also: Linux 4.4.9 Linux 3.14.68

Open source near ubiquitous in IoT, report finds

Open source is increasingly standard operating procedure in software, but nowhere is this more true than Internet of Things development. According to a new VisionMobile survey of 3,700 IoT developers, 91% of respondents use open source software in at least one area of their software stack. This is good news for IoT because only open source promises to reduce or eliminate the potential for lock-in imposed by proprietary “standards.” What’s perhaps most interesting in this affection for open source, however, is that even as enterprise developers have eschewed the politics of open source licensing, IoT developers seem to favor open source because “it’s free as in freedom.” Read more

Ubuntu 16.04 – My Experience so Far and Customization

While I earnestly anticipated the release of Unity 8 with Xenial Xerus (after watching a couple of videos that showcased its function), I was utterly disappointed that Canonical was going to further push its release — even though it was originally meant to debut with Ubuntu 14.04. Back to the point at hand, I immediately went ahead and installed Unity Tweak Tool, moved my dash to the bottom (very important) and then proceeded to replace Nautilus with the extensive Nemo file manager which is native to Linux Mint and by far superior to the former (my opinion). Read more