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OpenOffice.org 3.3

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OOo

Pros

Updated user interface, particularly in Impress
Stronger document-protection options in Writer and Calc
Improved print dialogue in Writer
More attractive charts and usable pivot tables in Calc

Cons

Word 2010 couldn't open a password-protected ODF document in our tests
No SVG import in Draw

Amid infighting between Oracle and defecting OpenOffice developers, can the new version of OpenOffice.org, 3.3.0, deliver its 'fit and trim' release promise? And how does the new version stack up against the leading paid-for productivity suite, Microsoft Office?

OpenOffice 3.3 was supposed to be a fairly swift update to the open-source office suite, adding some useful features, showcasing the first results of the Renaissance project to improve the user interface — and proving that OpenOffice was still safe in Oracle's hands.

Instead, OOo 3.3 has been overshadowed by the departure of a number of core OpenOffice developers to set up The Document Foundation to steward the LibreOffice fork (which is based on the OpenOffice 3.3 code and promises significant future improvements like a new spreadsheet engine as well as what the foundation calls 'radical innovations' rather than the incremental changes that Oracle has focused on).

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Officially Announced

OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 (build OOO330m20) is out now!

In this feature release many new things were implemented. Get an overview what could be interesting for you in our Feature Overview. The Release Notes show this from a technical point of view. Of course there is also an official Press Announcement.

Get it now from the download webpage.

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