Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Maddog bites Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

In the past 30 years, Linux legend Jon "maddog" Hall has worked at more technical jobs and taught more students about the technical aspects of IT than he probably cares to remember. One thing he does remember, however, is his nickname, given to him by his students at Hartford State Technical College, in Connecticut. It's a name the ageing, bearded guru has come to enjoy.

The executive director of non-profit advocacy organisation Linux International, Mr Hall, like many Linux evangelists, has made a career out of being a worker rather than captain of industry. He has been a programmer, systems designer, systems administrator, product manager, technical marketing manager, consultant and tertiary-level teacher, among other things. The companies at which he has worked, a mixture of users and vendors, include Western Electric, Aetna Life & Casualty, Bell Labs, Digital Equipment Corporation and VA Linux Systems.

When Mr Hall visits Sydney in late March to speak at the LinuxWorld Australia conference and Expo, it will not be specifically to can Microsoft.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC

Variscite unveiled a 50 x 20mm “DART-MX6″ module that runs Linux or Android on the Freescale i.MX6, with up to 64GB eMMC flash and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite’s claim that the 50 x 20mm DART-MX6 is the world’s smallest computer-on-module based on Freescale’s i.MX6 system-on-chip appears to be a valid one. It beats the smallest ones we’ve seen to date: TechNexion’s 40 x 36mm PICO-IMX6, and Solid-Run’s 47 x 30mm microSOM i4. It’s also just a hair larger than Variscite’s own 52 x 17mm DART-4460, which is based on a dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, and Gumstix’s slightly larger 58 x 17mm Overo modules, which use TI Sitara AM37xx SoCs. Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review

The BQ Aquaris e4.5 Ubuntu Edition is not the debut Canonical must have envisaged for Ubuntu Phone, in the early days of the platform’s development. It’s a perfectly functional smartphone for the most part, and we like the concept of scopes, but the hardware is humdrum, performance is sluggish, and the software running on it is rough and ready, and full of holes. We’ll be tracking the progress of Ubuntu Phone with interest – it surely must get better than this – but this first device is one to write off to experience. Read more