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CentOS 6: interview with Karanbir Singh

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Linux
Interviews

CentOS developers are working hardly to release CentOS 6, the latest incarnation of the popular Red Hat rebuild, widely used around the world. We decided to make some questions about CentOS 6 status to Karanbir Singh, a long time CentOS developer, part of the CentOS Admin team, infrastructure team and responsible for the CentOS Build services.

Q: Recently you wrote a tweet regarding CentOS 6 status asking your readers to choose between CentOS 6 or 5.6. Could you summarize the results obtained from the readers’ answers?

A: “The aim of that question was to get a sense for what people consider to be more important and how they prioritise things. For us, thats a big deal – delivering and working on whats the most important thing at the moment. We like to think of ourselves as being a fairly agile group of people. And like any small agile team, its important to focus on the most important thing for the time rather than spreading the wings too thin and not being able to deliver on any count. The user feedback was as expected, a large majority consider 5.6 to be the more important delivery since it impacts an existing installed production base. So thats what we are working to release first”.

Q: In a past tweet you said that CentOS 6 is almost done. Could you describe to our readers the state of the art of CentOS 6′s development?

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