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People behind Debian: Mike Hommey, Firefox/Iceweasel maintainer

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Linux
Interviews

For as long as I have known Mike, he’s been maintaining one of the largest (and most widely used) package: Iceweasel, Debian’s default web browser. It’s effectively Mozilla’s Firefox although it has been renamed to avoid some rules enforced by Mozilla’s trademark policy. But we might see Firefox back in Debian… read on to know Mike’s plans.

What’s your biggest achievement within Debian?

I am quite proud that Squeeze will be the first Debian release where Iceweasel works on all supported architectures. Previously, we only knew the package compiled on all these architectures. Starting with Squeeze, we know it passes several of the test suites coming with the source code. This ensures most of the browser is functional. It was actually far from being the case before, as it appeared when the test suites were first enabled.

I think it is very important to have properly working packages on all our supported architectures. The current evolution of hardware shows how important it still is. Who would have thought a few years back that we would see ARM or MIPS based netbooks today ?

What are your plans for Debian Wheezy?

rest here




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