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An Interview with System76 co-founder Carl Richell

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Hardware
Interviews
Ubuntu

I imagine quite a few of you have heard of System76. System76 is a company that provides and supports Ubuntu pre-installed laptops, desktops, and servers. What I expect is not so well known is the people behind System76. I thought it would be a nice idea to get to know them better.

2. When and how did you become interested in computers? in Linux? in Ubuntu?

I think Pong – the single game console – got me started. Something about controlling what’s happening on a screen with your hands. In middle school we were tasked with writing a letter to our hero. I wrote Steve Jobs. In 1995 I wrote a letter to the CEO of IBM urging them to create a competing OS to the impending Windows 95 monopoly. I haven’t really put that together before… it’s strange to be here now.

Ubuntu, and in particular, Canonical’s business model, caught my attention when I started searching for the System76 distro of choice. The lack of an “Enterprise” pay version was important. From my perspective, Canonical and Ubuntu had all the right pieces in place – something that didn’t exist anywhere else.

Hoary was the first release I installed and our first computer – a Gazelle 2600 laptop – shipped with Breezy. We sold one computer our first month Smile

rest here




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