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Multidimensional Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

The next major release of Ubuntu Linux will include both a 2D and a 3D interface. This is the latest news from the development team which is working on Ubuntu 11.04, otherwise known as Natty Narwhal.

The Natty Narwhal release of Linux promises to be a significant release in the growing list of Ubuntu releases as the Mark Shuttleworth-led development team pushes into new territory with the operating system.

Fans of the popular operating system will already know that the desktop in the new release will be significantly different from previous releases. Part of this will be the result of including the new Wayland graphics system. This new system for rendering the desktop graphics and applications is widely regarded as the correct way forward for Linux desktops but is still in early development.

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Multidelusional Ubuntu

Should be Multidelusional Ubuntu for pushing this silly interface.

re: Multidelusional Ubuntu

Yeah, I think they'll lose a lot of loyal users when it's released. But they won't lose all of them. There'll be two basic types of Ubuntu articles all over the net come April: the "this interface sucks big time" type and, a fewer number of the "oh man this is so cool" type. I doubt there'll be a whole lot in the middle.

I imagine Mint will see a surge, and some others to a lesser degree.

But I think part of Ubuntu's plan is to make it harder on derivatives to base their distros on Ubuntu. Come Wayland, it's going to be tougher. The "remixes" will probably start dropping like flies.

re: Nerdtastic Noobuntu

Mint is already dabbling in a rolling release based on Debian. So I think they're hedging their bets on whether Unoobtu will just completely flake out on them or not.

Plus Unoobtu can't get too snooty with their spinoffs, otherwise Debian might start playing that game as well - and then Unoobtu will have nothing to work with (except their delightful brown and violet crayons).

Ubuntu

srlinuxx wrote:
... There'll be two basic types of Ubuntu articles all over the net come April: the "this interface sucks big time" type and, a fewer number of the "oh man this is so cool" type. I doubt there'll be a whole lot in the middle...

I think you hit that one right on the nose of the stereotypical lumbering, drooling, mouth-breathing Ubuntu fanboy.

Wayland has potential ... Unity, I don't think so.

It will be interesting to see if Canonical can pull it off and still maintain a substantial user base. I may not agree with their judgment, but I give them credit for trying something new.

Re: Ubuntu

Quote:
It will be interesting to see if Canonical can pull it off and still maintain a substantial user base. I may not agree with their judgment, but I give them credit for trying something new.

Well they had to because with Gnome and KDE You're not going anywhere - in the sense that you're not getting past the traditional Linux user base by much - that is a fact proven by history. They want to have a shot at the broader mainstream market, to which they think they're offering something new and attractive. After all the Linux kernel is a nice weapon in that market - see Android - but the traditional Linux graphics stack has proven useless there. Plus they're going to own the code so they can change and/or fix it when they see fit to suit the market needs, and not in the usual three years that Gnome takes.

As for the traditional Linux fanbase, they're already there at the top along with the various openSuse and Fedora. Most of those folks are going to swap distributions for the sake of it anyway, and they know how to install their favorite DE, so Canonical has really nothing to lose or win there.

Whether they're going somewhere or they're misguided only time will tell, but they sure got me excited with this thing. I'll try it out on my laptop further down the road. It costs nothing, and I do my real work on an old desktop with Gnome Tongue

Microsoft Bob

Ubuntu Unity = Microsoft Bob

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