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Linus Torvalds: looking back, looking forward

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Linux
Interviews

Most years, Linus Torvalds comes to Australia. He apparently likes the place, so the creator of the Linux kernel makes his way to the Australian national Linux conference in January.

He's been doing this since 2003, when the affable Leon Brooks organised the LCA in Perth, only missing out in 2010 when the event moved across the Tasman to Wellington.

Torvalds is an excellent subject for an interview; he never evades a question, not even if he has a single word to offer as reply. And despite claiming to have a big ego, he is indeed very approachable.

He couldn't sit down for an interview as he was leaving the conference the morning after I approached him; hence this was done by email.

iTWire: It's been nearly 20 years now since that now-famous message posted to comp.os.minix announced the arrival of something that has grown beyond anyone's imagination. Have there been any occasions when you've thought of walking away from it?

Linus Torvalds: Walking away? No. There have certainly been times of frustration, and times when I've really wanted to take a break, but quite frankly, even then it's been "I need to get away from this for a few hours (or days) to relax and do something else" rather than anything more than that.

rest here




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