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Open-Xchange Launches Comprehensive Feature Upgrade

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Linux

Extended Usability, Security and Integration Capabilities for Linux-based Collaboration Suite

TARRYTOWN, NY, February 15, 2006 – Open-Xchange, Inc. today announced a comprehensive feature update for Open-Xchange Server 5 to be released next month. Customers get access to more than 100 improvements, all of which are designed to improve the usability and integration capabilities of the leading open source collaboration software.

Open-Xchange Server 5 provides key messaging functions like email, calendaring, contacts and task management -- fully integrated with advanced groupware features such as document sharing, project tracking, user forums, and a knowledge base. Open-Xchange Server 5 offers major productivity improvements through object 'linking' and 'permissioning' and works with 'rich clients' such as Microsoft Outlook as well as most browsers and mobile devices.

“The current release of Open-Xchange Server 5 has been helping organizations collaborate and be more productive for the last year," said Frank Hoberg, CEO Open-Xchange. "Our customers and partners have suggested improvements to our current feature set as well as new functionality. Open-Xchange has listened to those requests and is excited to offer Service Pack 1.”

Upgrades include:
· Enhanced usability for Microsoft Outlook users
o Push technology ensures real-time connection for Outlook users and reduces server load, enhanced support of global address book, and user modification within Microsoft Outlook vacation notice, filter rules, password, etc.
· Extended search capabilities and functionality.
· GUI and usability enhancements for Contacts and Calendar including new Calendar look-and-feel, customizable layout for contact lists and extended print functionality for selected contacts.
· Improved project management visualization
· RSS feed support
· Security Enhancements -- added encryption protocols SSL and TLS support to ensure secure mail (IMAPS, SMTPS), internal server communication (LDAPS)and to secure ALL connections between clients and Open-Xchange Server
· Distributed Mail Server Support

For a detailed list of new features, please visit http://www.open-xchange.com/EN/product/sp.html

Open-Xchange has customers in more than 55 countries since its launch in April 2005. Sales growth is particularly strong in German speaking countries, the United States and France. To date, Open-Xchange has recruited more than 300 partners in 40 countries.

About Open-Xchange Server
Open-Xchange Server is one of the most active and fastest growing open source projects to date. Launched in August 2004, Open-Xchange Server now ranks #7 out of 353 groupware projects on freshmeat.net website, #1 in document repositories, #4 in handhelds, and overall #210 out of 39,896 listed projects. The Open-Xchange community website, www.open-xchange.org, is visited by 170,000 unique visitors each month, the GPL version of Open-Xchange Server is downloaded more than 9,000 times each month.

Open-Xchange Server 5, the commercial product launched in April 2005, is engineered for ease of installation, migration, administration, integration and use. Open-Xchange Server supports the two leading Enterprise Linux distributions, Red Hat and SUSE. Innovative connectors, OXtenders, enhance customer flexibility by using open standard APIs to integrate existing IT infrastructures, or even extend capabilities to mobile devices, fax servers and Samba administration tools.

Open-Xchange Server 5, Advanced Server Edition (one server and 25 named users), is available at www.open-xchange.com and through select partners for EUR / $ 850. The package includes a one-year subscription to the Open-Xchange Maintenance Portal, installation and administration interfaces, initial installation support, as well as Outlook and Palm connectors. Annual maintenance subscription fee for additional clients is EUR / $25 per named user.

About Open-Xchange Inc.
Open-Xchange Inc. delivers reliable and scalable groupware, collaboration, and messaging solutions. Its flagship product, Open-Xchange Server, is the market-leading collaboration server that combines best-of-breed open source software with commercial software add-ons and connectors. Open-Xchange Server is among the Top 250 most popular and most active open source projects in the world today.
Open-Xchange Inc. is headquartered in Tarrytown, NY, with research & development and operations concentrated in Olpe and Nuremberg, Germany. For more information, please visit www.open-xchange.com

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