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Linux, Unix Players Beef Up Security

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Linux

As expected, archrivals Sun, Red Hat and Novell unveileed major security improvements for their respective Unix and Linux platforms this week.

At the RSA Conference in San Jose, Calif., Sun revealed plans to release Solaris Trusted Extensions into beta testing in April and simultaneously enter evaluation for Common Criteria Certification at EAL 4+ certification, against Labeled Security Protection Profile (LSPP).

LSPP is one of three levels of advanced security options that are part of EAL 4+, deemed essential for financial, healthcare and government customers that need to protect multiple level of classified data on a single system.

LSPP will add to the existing certification of Solaris 10, now under evaluation, against Controlled Access Protection Profile (CAPP) and Role Based Access Control Protection Profile (RBACPP) at EAL 4+, Sun said.

Sun said the Trusted Extensions will be offered as an add-on to its base Solaris 10 operating system in August.

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