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Best Linux blogging software: 8 clients tested

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Software

Everybody has opinions. For some reason, many people feel better about life if everybody's informed of those opinions in meticulous detail. The act of 'blogging' was born in the early 21st century when such folk discovered the internet.

These days, the place is awash with humans and their odd ideas (and even some good ones). Now's the time to join the throng.

While all of the notable platforms for blogging provide their own online tools for creating and editing entries, there are times when a standalone desktop client can be a better option.

Perhaps you want or need to edit offline, or you'd like to schedule your posts for a later date. Maybe you have too many blogs and you just need some help to manage them all, or you may find the desktop – where you can drag and drop as well as copy and paste – better for handling media.

A good blogging client will be able to easily connect to the platform of your choice, manage multiple blogs, take note of any idiosyncrasies, and be quick and straightforward to use.

In this Roundup, we've included a real mix of software, including native Linux clients, ones that run on cross-platform frameworks, standard desktop apps and browser extensions.

rest here




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