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No more desktop Linux systems in the German Foreign Office

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Linux

In response to a question on "the use of open source software in the Foreign Office and other Government departments" submitted in parliament by the SPD (Social Democrats, the main German opposition party), the German government has confirmed that the German Foreign Office is to switch back to Windows desktop systems. The Foreign Office started migrating its servers to Linux in 2001 and since 2005 has also used open source software such as Firefox, Thunderbird and OpenOffice on its desktop systems. Mobile systems use a Debian GNU/Linux based Linux and office PCs are configured with a dual Windows / Linux boot.

Back in 2007, the Foreign Office's IT department regarded the use of open source software on servers and desktop systems as a success story.

rest here




Windows Germans

Bribes always work in any country, even in those holier-than-thou northern countries. And they refuse to give any actual figure supporting their choice but just parrot the usual precooked M$ tripe (interoperability drivers users complaining blah blah). Not surprising and not new, the real surprise is that this is Germany, not Sicily.

Re: autoupdate

atang1 wrote:
Windows are autoupdated

Only motorized ones, when connected to a sun sensor.

WinME update

atang1 wrote:
I use ME and XP, so I know how much change from the original versions that I installed(over ten hours of update each)

My ZX Spectrum took 25 hours to update, I almost burned my tape recorder.

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