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Comparing CTK Arch Live and ArchBang

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Linux

Today I’ll be comparing two Arch Linux-based Openbox Distributions: ArchBang and CTKArchLive.

A few years ago, CrunchBang (“#!”) Linux became very popular as a lightweight Ubuntu-based distribution that made the Openbox window manager more palatable and appealing. Since then, it’s only gotten better and more popular, along the way ditching the Ubuntu base for Debian and gaining an Xfce version on the way. Because it was the first very popular Openbox distribution, it has inspired the creation of other distributions that use Openbox on top of various other base distributions. For example, Madbox, which I have recently reviewed, is based on Ubuntu to fill the gap from #!’s move to Debian.

The two I’m testing today, CTKArchLive and ArchBang, are, as you can probably guess by their names, based on Arch Linux. Aside from Chakra GNU/Linux, a KDE-using distribution that’s sort of based on Arch that I’ve tested before for FreeTechie.com, I’ve never really used Arch before. Neither of these distributions claim to cater to relative newbies like Chakra does, so I may have to play the whole manual configuration thing by ear, as I’ve never done that before in depth. I will say, however, that I have tried the live session of a previous ArchBang release before briefly in a live session. Continue reading to see how each one turns out. I tested both of these by using the MultiSystem multiboot USB creation script on the two ISO files and trying each via a live USB system. As I just want to focus on the live sessions, I did not install either of these.

rest here




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