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People behind Debian: Maximilian Attems, of the kernel team

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Linux
Interviews

Maximilian, along with the other members of the Debian kernel team, has the overwhelming job of maintaining the Linux kernel in Debian. It’s one of the largest package and certainly one where dealing with bug reports is really difficult as most of them are hardware-specific, and thus difficult to reproduce.

He’s very enthusiastic and energetic, and does not fear criticizing when something doesn’t please him.

What’s your biggest achievement within Debian?

Building lots and lots of kernels together with an growing uptake of the officially released linux images.

I joined the Debian kernel team shortly after Herbert Xu departed. I had been upstream Maintainer of the linux-2.6 janitor project for almost a year brewing hundreds of small cleanups with quilt in a tree named kjt for early linux-2.6. In Debian we had lots of fun in sorting out the troubles that the long 2.5 freeze had imposed: Meaning we were sitting on a huge diverging “monolithic” semi-good patchset.

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