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KDE 3.4beta2 revisited

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KDE
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KDE 3.4, due out mid-March, is going to be really nice, judging by the betas. I ran beta1 when it was released and finished installing beta2 this morning (or actually last night while I slept). I've found both of the betas to be stable enough to run daily and expect this to only improve by final release. There are many new features and a definite speed increase over 3.3. In fact, there are a few new surprises since beta1. Please feel free to venture over to the gallery to take a look at some screenshots. Mostly they are the default look, but some customizations are shown at the beginning and end of the album.

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