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An Open Letter to the Libre Office Design Team

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Libre Office is one of the most exciting forks currently in the open source world. I believe that statement so strongly that I have even put my money where my mouth is and financially contributed to this project. That said, I'm concerned they are preparing to perpetuate the same errors that OOo was making with respect to bad UI design and poor marketing.

The first thing to point out is the name. Running all together to make one word was dumb and Lbre Office is trying to do the same (LibreOffice). Worse yet was how people would say "O-O-O" and now I see people calling this new office suite "LibO" on the mailing lists. If you want a shorter nick name you should call it "Libre" as saying freedom just sounds cool and certainly has a lot of excitement behind it. It makes me think of tech savy youth in the Middle East that are willing to risk their lives for libre/freedom.

The web site for Libre Office is horrible, which was initially ok as it was just getting started, but now that they've put a little effort into the site it actually looks worse.

rest here

Also: LibreOffice Pips To The Post: Review

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