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LibreOffice Suite Features Unique to Open Source Community

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Lest anyone complain that the free-software world doesn’t offer enough choices, there are now two major open source office suites vying for the hearts and minds of choosy end users. But since both of these products — OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice — derive from the same codebase, what actually sets them apart? Here we take a look at a few features unique to LibreOffice.

With Ubuntu set to default to LibreOffice in a couple months — and with other Linux distributions also planning a switch, if they haven’t already made it — I figured it was time to see what I have to look forward to (or not) in LibreOffice come April. So I downloaded a recent build courtesy of LibreOffice Launchpad PPA and fired it up.

LibreOffice Diverges

My first thought upon launching LibreOffice Writer was that it looks almost exactly OpenOffice Writer. Besides some icon and color changes — which probably derive from the fact that the build I used was not from the official Ubuntu repositories, rather than from inherent peculiarities in LibreOffice itself — the interfaces are pretty identical:

rest here




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