Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Looking for help to bring a new app to the world

Aloha folks,

For those programmers, packagers, etc... who might be looking to help on a new project, maybe you will find this interesting.

I am working on bringing a new locally installable app for beekeeping to the world. I am not a programmer, I won't even pretend to be, but I know beekeeping, I know networking, servers and installation issues, etc as a network tech/admin for the past about 15 years.

There have been a few new introductions come out that are web based, but they are not open source nor are they available for download to run on one's own server.

Web based apps are fine perhaps for hobbyists, but for beekeepers with a large number of hives and especially those in business, there are certain risks inherent in web based apps that are much better solved by a locally installed app.

I am working to put together a very inclusive local app that accommodates a variety of hive types and management methods as many beekeepers are incorporating a variety of hive types instead of relying only one one as has been seen in the past.

Ideally, I am hoping to get the result of a web facing server app that a local business can install and run on one machine at home or on their own server so that their employees where-ever they might bee can access it as well.

It will need to be designed in the vein as a firefox or libreoffice, etc in that there will need to be a way to install it to Windows, Linux, even Apple machines.

If you are interested in helping make this happen, please contact me at bigbear at bbe-tech.com

More in Tux Machines

Open source for slow food and small farms

Looking at the challenges—and opportunities—of FarmBot, I'm reminded a bit of the factors that played into the origin of the world's first open source company, Cygnus. That history traces back to 1987, the year that Richard Stallman released version 1.0 of the GNU C compiler. At that time, compiler ports cost millions of dollars and took years to deliver. I was very interested in writing compilers, but I saw no prospect for doing so because (1) there were very few compiler companies in the world, and (2) they employed a very small number of people—most of whom were famous for having written the few compilers I'd ever heard of. Who would hire somebody with no commercial compiler experience to work on something so rare and valuable? Read more

Best Linux and Web-Based Alternatives to Final Draft

As far as writing screenplays is concerned, Hollywood has only one standard: Final Draft. For years, much like Microsoft's monopoly with Windows, the software had no big competitors. From big Hollywood directors like Spielberg to small independent studios, everyone considered Final Draft the gold standard of screenwriting software. In many ways, it still enjoys the same monopoly; however, the stronghold it had over the screenwriting industry isn't the same as before. With its high price, clunky UI, and lots of persistent bugs, Final Draft is slowly being taken over by lesser-known tools in this huge shift that is happening in the screenwriting industry. Many big writers have slowly started to move to alternative software. One of the biggest proponents of this move is John August, screenwriter of movies like Big Fish and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. His efforts in pushing the open Fountain format, as well as creating Highland, a Mac-based screenwriting software are an indication of how badly Final Draft users need a change. If you've been stuck with Final Draft for years or are a Linux user looking for alternatives, this is a great time to start writing your screenplay. These days, a lot of new tools have come up that let you write your script either on your Linux desktop or in a browser. And yes, most of these tools are as good as -- and many times -- better than Final Draft. Read more

Top 4 open source invoicing tools for freelancers and small businesses

Small business owners and freelancers put a lot of work into their businesses. They do that not only because they’re passionate about what they do, but they also have the goal of getting paid. That’s no small part of the job, either. Getting paid usually means sending a client an invoice. It’s easy enough to whip up an invoice using a word processor or a spreadsheet, but sometimes you need a bit more. A more professional look. A way of keeping track of your invoices. Reminders about when to follow up on the invoices that you’ve sent. There’s a wide range of commercial and closed-source invoicing tools out there. But the offerings on the open source side of the fence are just as good, and maybe even more flexible than their closed source counterparts. Let’s take a look at four open source invoicing tools that are great choices for freelancers and small businesses on a tight budget. Read more

Windows XP: Your upgrade experiences

I think more media attention needs to be brought to Linux [an open-source operating system] nowadays. I've tried many platforms and have found Lubuntu in particular to be a very sophisticated and extremely lightweight operating system. Even on computers with as little as 512MB of RAM the system boots, runs programs and shuts down like a bullet. Read more