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Looking for help to bring a new app to the world

Aloha folks,

For those programmers, packagers, etc... who might be looking to help on a new project, maybe you will find this interesting.

I am working on bringing a new locally installable app for beekeeping to the world. I am not a programmer, I won't even pretend to be, but I know beekeeping, I know networking, servers and installation issues, etc as a network tech/admin for the past about 15 years.

There have been a few new introductions come out that are web based, but they are not open source nor are they available for download to run on one's own server.

Web based apps are fine perhaps for hobbyists, but for beekeepers with a large number of hives and especially those in business, there are certain risks inherent in web based apps that are much better solved by a locally installed app.

I am working to put together a very inclusive local app that accommodates a variety of hive types and management methods as many beekeepers are incorporating a variety of hive types instead of relying only one one as has been seen in the past.

Ideally, I am hoping to get the result of a web facing server app that a local business can install and run on one machine at home or on their own server so that their employees where-ever they might bee can access it as well.

It will need to be designed in the vein as a firefox or libreoffice, etc in that there will need to be a way to install it to Windows, Linux, even Apple machines.

If you are interested in helping make this happen, please contact me at bigbear at bbe-tech.com

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