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Wayland For The Ubuntu Unity Desktop Redux

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Ubuntu

It was announced in early November that the Ubuntu Unity desktop will eventually use Wayland as its display server rather than an X.Org Server. In Mark Shuttleworth's post announcing Unity on Wayland he mentioned, "Timeframes are difficult. I'm sure we could deliver *something* in six months, but I think a year is more realistic for the first images that will be widely useful in our community. I’d love to be proven conservative on that Smile but I suspect it's more likely to err the other way. It might take four or more years to really move the ecosystem."

Since that November announcement there's been more Wayland activity with a much more lively Wayland mailing list, new patches coming about (e.g. to run Wayland off a Linux frame-buffer and a nested compositor back-end), GTK3 supporting Wayland, a Wayland back-end for Clutter, support for Mesa's EGL implementation, plans for good multi-monitor support, and various other milestones achieved. But are Canonical's adoption plans for Wayland still on track?

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