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Testing Ubuntu 11.04 “Natty Narwhal” Alpha 3

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Ubuntu

At this moment i’m testing the Ubuntu 11.04 “Natty Narwhal” Alpha 3 and wanted to give you a short heads up on my experience so far.

When the Alpha 3 was released i downloaded it and and made me a nice usb installer that didn’t work. I started my system and booted from the usb flash drive and waited for the installation setup screen that never showed up..

So i decided to shutdown my testing system and burn the image on a cd. When the cd was ready to use i booted my testing system from the cd rom player and there it was…. the installation screen. After entering my location and user name, system name and the partition i wanted to install Ubuntu 11.04 alpha 3 on it started installing. But when the installation was almost finished i got an error message that told me that it couldn’t continue with the installation because some files where missing and if i wanted i could file a bug report about it.

rest here




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