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10 best alternative operating systems

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OS

Right now, someone, somewhere is developing the killer operating system feature of the future. We'll look at the best alternative operating systems, with the potential to change the computing landscape over the next decade. There's only one rule - no Microsoft, Apple or Linux.

10. GNU/HURD

Fighting for microkernels
www.gnu.org/software/hurd

The GNU project started in 1984 to create a completely free software Unix OS. By the early '90s it had many tools finished, but still no kernel. Linux arrived and was paired with GNU to form what we now call Linux (also known as GNU/Linux).

However, the GNU project has been developing a kernel called HURD. This is based on the Mach microkernel, as used in Mac OS X, and consists of servers running in their own address spaces.

rest here




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