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Vincent Untz: I Wonder Why We Have All Our Distributions Around

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Software
Interviews
SUSE

The GNU/Linux landscape is changing dramatically. 2011 is a very important year for Gnome and GNU/Linux. Gnome is the default desktop environment used by major distros and it is going through a major transition with version 3. At the same time openSuse community is driving many ambitious initiatives such as the AppStream project. We talked to Vincent Untz, an openSUSE Booster, and the GNOME release manager to understand what's going on with these projects. He talks about Unity, Gnome 3, Mono and much more. Go ahead and read on...

Swapnil: When did you get involved with Free Software and what was the motivation?

Vincent: My first interaction with Free Software was when I installed Linux Mandrake 6.0 or 6.1 in 1999, I believe. It was mostly out of curiosity, and to have something new to play with.

Then, in 2002, I started following closely what was happening in the GNOME world. I contributed a few patches to GnomeICU to fix issues I had. But I also sent patches for some GNOME 1.4.x module (gnome-pim) while everybody else was focusing on developing GNOME 2! I then actively followed the development of GNOME 2 by reading the mailing lists, and fell in love with the project. You could see the community was working hard in one direction, and that was boosting my motivation.

This lead me to start triaging bugs in GNOME, then fixing bugs, and after a while, I simply became active in many different areas.

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