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Berners-Lee to protect ‘open internet’

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Web

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web, is to work with broadband providers to make sure the internet is protected from corporate interests, the Government has announced.

Speaking after a summit on so-called net-neutrality – the idea that all web traffic, from video to email, should be treated equally – Communications Minister Ed Vaizey said “Internet traffic is growing. Handling that heavier traffic will become an increasingly significant issue so it was important to discuss how to ensure the Internet remains an open, innovative and competitive place.”

Sir Tim has agreed to help the Broadband Stakeholder Group build upon a recently published transparency document so that it includes the rights of consumers and business “to connect to whomever they wanted on the Internet without discrimination”, a statement from the Department for Culture, Media and Sport said.

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