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Puppy Linux sit! roll over, there now - good dog

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Linux

Linux is evolving. Linux is developing tiers, so that so-called "top tier" Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Fedora, openSUSE, Debian, Mandriva and others have been grabbing more of the headlines than some of the lesser known beasts in this Unix-like operating system ecosphere.

Of course this is not quite true and not at all fair -- some distributions will always be better suited to server-side deployment and then there is the whole parallel universe of mobile Linux.

So as the Linux ecosphere expands, are the smaller-scale distributions not getting the recognition they deserve?

Today's distro du jour is Puppy Linux. A tiny little thing requiring only 100MB of space with a boot time of only 30 seconds or so, due to the fact that it loads into RAM. This slim little dog might be well suited to older hardware or within environments where resources are limited or restricted. Even if your machine has no hard disk (or a broken hard disk), you can still boot Puppy from a CD or USB stick.

rest here




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