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Why You Should Always Keep Your Ubuntu Installation Updated

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Ubuntu

With a new release every six months, keeping up with Ubuntu can seem overwhelming. Still, there are many good reasons to keep updating to the latest version of Ubuntu: security updates, the latest software in the Software Center, optional access to bleeding edge programs and all of the latest features Ubuntu has to offer.

Next month’s Ubuntu release, 11.04 (codename Natty Narwal), will be radically different than releases before it. Using the Unity shell in place of the standard Gnome setup, 11.04 sports an elegant user interface and a plethora of changes. I’m using the alpha version on my primary computer (probably not a great idea, I realize) and am sincerely impressed. Expect a write-up next month, when 11.04 is officially released.

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