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How Many People Use GNU/Linux? Lots!

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Linux

I was reading in the transcripts of IPI v RedHat that back in the day, 12 million unique IP addresses connected to RedHat and Fedora repositories to update/install systems. If that number is good enough to use in court, it is probably good enough to use in my blog. When I checked today, Fedora Project showed 1.913 million in a recent week. If I combine that with an estimate of Fedora’s share of users of GNU/Linux, we have a very large number of users of GNU/Linux. According to Wikipedia, 2,350,000 hits came from Fedora of 111,806,000 hits that came from GNU/Linux (including Android/Linux). Unfortunately some of Fedora’s counts may be for multiple IP addresses to the same machine (DHCP), and some of the machines could be servers. According to RedHat, 10% of its machines are desktops, but most Fedora systems are desktops, so we should count Fedora machines as 1.913 million. Many will be behind a router and be undercounted that way (NAT), so let’s stick with 1.913 million.

Conclusion:




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