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Review: Bodhi Linux 1.0.0

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For those of you who have never heard of this distribution, Bodhi Linux is an Ubuntu derivative that is known for using Enlightenment E17 as its WM. It's meant to be lightweight, somewhat minimalistic applications-wise, pretty, and highly configurable and modular.

After the boot menu came possibly the neatest Plymouth boot splash I have ever seen. Is it a spinner? Nope. Is it dots filling up? Nope. Is it the Bodhi Linux title text or logo filling in? Nope, dot AVI. It's an animation of leaves flying off of a bodhi tree. Isn't that cool? I almost wished it could go on for longer, because shortly thereafter, I was taken to the screen where I could select the desktop theme and layout. I selected "Ecomorph" with the new wallpaper, because I also wanted to check out how the promised Compiz desktop effects would work out. Then, I was taken to the desktop.

rest here


After your first fifty distribution reviews, a certain ennui creeps in. Most have the same selection of software, and GNOME or KDE for a desktop, and, if they are new, are derived from Ubuntu. Under these circumstances, features worth writing about tend to be rare. That is why Bohdi Linux has been attracting attention from reviewers -- because it has actually done a few things differently.

That full story

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