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Review: Elementary OS 0.1 "Jupiter"

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Linux

Well, after quite a long wait, it has finally happened: the first official release of Elementary OS is here! Codenamed version 0.1 "Jupiter", it's based on Ubuntu 10.10 "Maverick Meerkat", so you may be thinking to yourself, "Why should I care about yet another Ubuntu derivative?" I'll admit that I had (and still have) slightly bought into the hype about Elementary OS, but there are plenty of reasons to care about Elementary OS.

I tested Elementary OS on a live USB made with UnetBootin. Although this is an Ubuntu-based distribution, I tested the installation just for fun (and to see if the developers have made any changes there) in a virtual machine with 384 MB of RAM allocated to the guest OS. Follow the jump to see what this icon theme-turned-full-fledged distribution is like.

I rebooted, changed the BIOS, got to the UnetBootin boot menu for Elementary OS, and opted to "try without installing".

rest here




Really a 0.1 release actually gets ANY press

Yawwwwwwwwwnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn.

Another 0.1 release of a clone of Unoobtu.

Now if only someone would make an app that could measure my complete indifference to such yawntastic news.

re: Really a 0.1 release actually gets ANY press

hey hey hey hey, I don't mind when you insult other folks, but I'd rather you didn't me. Rolling Eyes

Sry

Sry - my comment was addressed to the original source - not the uber-great news aggregate site Tuxmachines that does a superfragilicious job at keeping everyone informed and/or entertained.

Big Hug

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