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The hidden perils of DSL

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If you spend a lot of time online, you need a broadband Internet connection. Cable companies were the first to offer it to consumers, and telephone companies followed some time later with ADSL (or DSL, as it’s more commonly called). At this point, there is often little speed difference between the two, but there is more to consider than just speed. DSL services often contain hidden limitations (including one that may put your safety at risk), hassles, and costs that you won’t find out about until you’ve signed up.

Home security system troubles

Did you know that installing DSL service in your home requires you to put line filters on all of your telephones? More importantly, if you have a home security system that uses the phone line to communicate with its tracking service, you will need to install a line filter on it. Since the majority of consumers (even tech-savvy ones) don’t have the electrical expertise to accomplish this, they have to rely on the security company to install it. Such companies charge an upfront fee ($20-$30) for the filter, and more money to come out and install it. The alternative is to get a cellular connection for your security service, but that costs more money, too — if it’s even available to you.

If you don’t install the line filter on your security system, it will not be able to communicate with the security company. So if someone breaks into your house, or if a fire starts during the night, you will not be protected by the security system’s automatic emergency contact capabilities.

Kiss SMTP goodbye

Full Story.

What Happened.

I'm surprised to find such a FUD OP-ED piece here on Tuxmachines.

This article is one person's some-what misguided opinion about his local DSL service.

It neither applies to, or is accurate to make such sweeping statements about a global service.

SMTP - both of my email servers are running fine off my DSL circuit. It all depends on your provider.

Speed - my DSL is not even close to my cable, but it does come with /29 static IP's where my cable is dynamic. Once again, it all depends on your DSL and Cable provider.

DSL Filters - wow, it takes a master technician to be able to plug in DSL line filters - NOT. If you don't understand the technology - bad luck for you (stupid people don't get an automatic sympathy pass in my book).

How did this crap make it on this site? It's a rant on a blog - not a technical article of ANY interest.

Please stick to your normal hardcore techy stuff and leave the fluff to DIGG.

Re: What Happened.

vonskippy wrote:

I'm surprised to find such a FUD OP-ED piece here on Tuxmachines.

This article is one person's some-what misguided opinion about his local DSL service.

How did this crap make it on this site? It's a rant on a blog - not a technical article of ANY interest.

Please stick to your normal hardcore techy stuff and leave the fluff to DIGG.



<tucks tail between legs and scampers off hiding face in shame>

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