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Windows/Linux driver support comparison

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Microsoft
Software

There have been debates of Windows and Linux over the years about supported hardware and device drivers. Mostly the debates have come down to these facts:

- Support for hardware in Windows is excellent for hardware released around the same time for the version of Windows that it supports, since it is the dominant desktop OS and hardware manufacturers make sure that drivers are written.

- Support for hardware in Linux is also very good, but once in a while there are devices that are not supported because most drivers are written by the open source community, not the hardware manufacturer.

Recently however I came across a bad situation with Windows 7 64-bit and the Intel 82567/82568 network card, which is present in a lot of desktops and laptops. The issue?

rest here




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