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V. 3 - You Can't Go GNOME Again

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Now that Canonical has adopted Unity for its next Ubuntu release, it seems likely that no desktop environment in history has ever launched to as much scrutiny as the new GNOME 3.

Indeed, the GNOME project's latest contender made its long-awaited debut last week, and the reviews have been coming fast and furious ever since.

"The new desktop will likely appeal to users who share GNOME's philosophy of debris-free computing, but there are parts that seem to have been pared down too aggressively," wrote Ars Technica's Ryan Paul, for instance. "The whole environment is significantly less configurable than its predecessor and is missing a handful of important features."

On the other hand, while "even seasoned GNOME users will find many aspects that are very unfamiliar," The H acknowledged, "some aspects of GNOME 3.0 that seemed awkward at first have turned out to be well-crafted on closer inspection."

rest here

Future direction of GNOME

"I can just see the future according to GNOME," she mused. "'GNOME 4: One Desktop to Rule Them All... eliminating multitasking as 'too confusing' and multiple desktops as 'no longer needed since you can only run one application in one window at a time.' What could be simpler?"

Yeah, and what will you be left with? Windows.

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