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Linux Mint 9 LXDE, Part 2

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Linux

Back in January, when I installed Linux Mint 9 LXDE on a friend's older PC, I decided to install it on my "ham radio" computer as well, so that I could support him remotely if needed. (It's a great help to have the identical distribution running, so I can walk him through the menus, for example.) I use this computer about once a week for web browsing while I'm on the radio, though I intend to install a variety of ham radio applications someday.

The good news is that the installation went smoothly on my 700 MHz Pentium 3 with 256 MB of RAM. I had nothing I wanted to save on that PC, so I let LXDE take over the entire hard drive. It detected the video, and the network card, and the sound, with no problem. Then I began noticing a few quirks.

1. DNS. Our Internet router is set up to support DHCP, and I've never had a problem with guest computers (Linux, Windows, or Mac). Until now.

rest here




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