Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Here we go again with the XGL

First it was Novell announcing its contribution of the Xgl graphics subsystem and the 'Compiz ' compositing manager to the X.org project. These enhancements open up a whole world of hardware acceleration, fancy animation, separating hardware resolution from software resolution, and more. As a result, Linux desktops will become more usable, end-user productivity will increase, and Linux is firmly positioned at the forefront of client computing technology.

Now Fedora jumps in and is doing something totally different than Novell. AIGLX is a project that aims to enable GL-accelerated effects on a standard desktop. We have a lightly modified X server (that includes a couple of extensions), an updated Mesa package that adds some new protocol support and a version of metacity with a composite manager.

And finally Mandriva hops on board with something that is going to be different than the other two. "We've have already started packaging Xorg 7.0 but we don't have any set of packages useful at this moment." On Xgl and Xegl: "Mandriva is not going to officially adopt the Novell Xgl server (Xglx). Instead, we are trying to push the Xegl[2] development.

I think we should lock all these developers in a room and nobody gets out until a standard is set!

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

What

I dont understand anything you write dude!

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Studio 18.10 Wallpaper Contest Winners

We would like to thank everyone who participated in our wallpaper contest for Ubuntu Studio 18.10! With 487 votes, the top 5 submissions were chosen. The winners can be found at this link. Additionally, we’d like to announce the new default wallpaper for 18.10, designed by Ubuntu Studio developer Eylul Dogruel, and is pictured to the right. Read more

Red Hat Leftovers

Folding@Home Performance Is Looking Good On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

Yesterday I published a number of CUDA and OpenCL benchmarks for the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics card that happened to show the very strong GPU compote potential for this new Turing GPU. Another workload with promising potential for this powerful but pricey graphics card is Folding@Home. Folding@Home was accidentally left out of yesterday's RTX 2080 Ti CUDA/OpenCL comparison with simply forgetting to add the FAHBench test profile to the run queue. But as there is often interest in seeing the FAHBench performance on new GPUs by at least a few of the premium enablers, I ran some extra tests just looking at the Folding@Home performance and here are those results today. Read more

today's howtos