Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LibreOffice 3.4 Beta 1 Available, Oracle Unchains OpenOffice

Filed under
LibO
OOo

April 15 brought some interesting developments in the office suite front. Oracle's press release announcing its intention of halting commercial interest in OpenOffice.org came hours before The Document Foundation announced the release of LibreOffice 3.4 Beta 1.

Today, only a couple of months after its initial commercial release, Oracle announced that it would move OpenOffice.org to a purely community-based Open Source project. The only reason given was "the breadth of interest in free personal productivity applications and the rapid evolution of personal computing technologies." This might be interpreted to mean that the commercial offering didn't sell very well since most folks prefer the no-cost option. Oracle may not wish to invest further funding in a product that will not support itself. So, they just gave OpenOffice.org back to the Open Source community.

However, shortly after Oracle's news, The Document Foundation announced their next developmental release for the upcoming 3.4.

rest here




Too Little, Too Late

pcworld.com: It's hard to say for certain what prompted Oracle to do an about-face on Friday and release OpenOffice.org to the community. After all, it was only a few short months ago that the company made clear its intentions to keep control of the productivity suite itself, spurring the creation of the Document Foundation and its LibreOffice fork.

It's not yet entirely clear what, exactly, Oracle plans to do with the software. Will it give it to the Document Foundation, for instance? And will it retain rights to the OpenOffice brand? The answers to both questions remain to be seen, and Oracle has reportedly declined to comment about them.

It certainly seems safe to assume that the commercial version of the software hasn't been selling too well--not well enough, anyway.

The World Has Moved On

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu-based Smartphones And Tablets Sound Good, On Paper, But...Do They Make Any Sense?
    As I previously stated in a recent article, I'm a huge fan of Ubuntu as a desktop operating system. It's friendly, reliable, consumes little resources and is largely virus-free.
  • Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ expected to be based on Ubuntu 16.04
    Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ coming soon, to be based on Ubuntu 16.04 and have plenty of new features
  • BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet - The heat is on
    Some investments are financial. Some are emotional. When it comes to Linux on tablets, my motives are mostly of the latter kind. I was super-excited to learn BQ was launching a tablet with Ubuntu, something that I have been waiting for a good solid three years now. We had the phone released last spring, and now there's a tablet. The cycle is almost complete. Now, as you know, I was only mildly pleased with the Ubuntu phone. It is a very neat product, but it is not yet as good as the competitors, across all shades of the usability spectrum. But this tablet promises a lot. Full HD, desktop-touch continuum, seamless usage model, and more. Let us have a look.
  • Kubuntu-16.04 — a review
    The kubuntu implementation of Plasma 5 seems to work quite well. It’s close to what I am seeing in other implementations. It includes the Libre Office software, rather than the KDE office suite. But most users will prefer that anyway. I’m not a big fan of the default menu. But the menu can easily be switched to one of the alternative forms. I’ve already done that, and am preferring the “launcher based on cascading popup menus”. If you are trying kubuntu, I suggest you experiment with the alternative formats to see which you prefer.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review: Very Stable & Improved, Buggy Software Center, Though
    In almost all the occasions that I tested Ubuntu LTS releases, quite rightly so, they’ve always worked better than the non-LTS releases. And this Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the 6th of such release is no exception. This one actually is even more impressive than the others because it has addressed some security related issues and even although not critical, subtle issues that I mentioned in the review. As far as the performance was concerned, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was only largely outperformed by the memory usage where there is a large increase in memory usage. Other than that, those numbers look pretty good to me. That ‘.deb’ file issues with the Software Center is the only major concern that I can come up with. But I’m sure it’ll be fixed very soon.

Devuan Beta, Stumbling Tumbleweed, Ubuntu Too

Today in Linux news Debian-fork Devuan is forging ahead with its plans to create a distribution offering init freedom by releasing a beta for testers. Douglas DeMaio posted today that openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have halted due to glibc upgrade rebuilds. Dedoimedo reviewed the BQ Aquaris M10 and liliputing.com posted of another Ubuntu laptop for sale. And finally, the Hectic Geek reviewed Ubuntu 16.04 and Neil Rickert reviewed Kubuntu 16.04. Read more Also: Devuan releases beta Devuan Jessie - beta release announcement

Devuan Jessie beta released

dear Init Freedom Lovers, once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you. As promised two years ago with the first declaration of Exodus from Debian, today we can proudly state: we do not go gentle into that good night. Now has come the time to announce the Beta release of Devuan. Debian GNU+Linux is a fork of Debian without systemd, on its way to become much more than that. This Beta release marks an important milestone towards the sustainability and the continuation of Devuan as an universal base distribution. Read more Also: Beta Released Of Devuan, The Systemd-Free Version Of Debian

GNOME News