Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Here we go again with the XGL

First it was Novell announcing its contribution of the Xgl graphics subsystem and the 'Compiz ' compositing manager to the X.org project. These enhancements open up a whole world of hardware acceleration, fancy animation, separating hardware resolution from software resolution, and more. As a result, Linux desktops will become more usable, end-user productivity will increase, and Linux is firmly positioned at the forefront of client computing technology.

Now Fedora jumps in and is doing something totally different than Novell. AIGLX is a project that aims to enable GL-accelerated effects on a standard desktop. We have a lightly modified X server (that includes a couple of extensions), an updated Mesa package that adds some new protocol support and a version of metacity with a composite manager.

And finally Mandriva hops on board with something that is going to be different than the other two. "We've have already started packaging Xorg 7.0 but we don't have any set of packages useful at this moment." On Xgl and Xegl: "Mandriva is not going to officially adopt the Novell Xgl server (Xglx). Instead, we are trying to push the Xegl[2] development.

I think we should lock all these developers in a room and nobody gets out until a standard is set!

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

What

I dont understand anything you write dude!

More in Tux Machines

Debian-based Raspbian and RebeccaBlackOS

Nvidia's Shield tablet K1: The best Android tablet you can get under $200

Nvidia is doing an impressive job with its Shield platform. The tablet received the Android 6.0 Marshmallow Over the Air (OTA) update just a week ago. In addition to stock Android, Nvidia has installed its core apps on the tablet, including the Shield Hub. Since it’s an Android tablet you can install all supported apps, games and services on the device. Read more

Leftovers: OSS (India, Voting, Education)

  • IT sector: Promote open source, bring enabling provisions for Start-up India
    The IT/ITeS sector, one of the largest contributors to exports in the country, has played a vital role in shaping the overall growth story of India. In view of the challenging business environment, the sector has significant expectations from the ensuing Union Budget 2016 on the tax and policy initiatives front.
  • S.F. Officials Push for Adoption of Pioneering Open-Source Voting System [Ed: Beware Microsoft]
    San Francisco could launch a major makeover of its voting systems this year, an effort that supporters say will lead to cheaper, more transparent elections in the city. On Tuesday, Supervisor Scott Wiener will call for a Board of Supervisors hearing into the city’s efforts to adopt a voting system that would use off-the-shelf hardware and open-source software. Elections officials, politicians and voter-participation activists have all touted such publicly owned balloting systems as cheaper and more trustworthy than using products supplied by private vendors. “We want to set a trend here and around the country toward more open and transparent voting systems,” Wiener said in an interview.
  • Open Source Assignments for Non-Programming Classes
    I’ve been flirting with the idea of asking students in my Educational Game Design module to make their projects “open source”. I am wary of the way non-computer scientists use the term “open source”. I often hear people mistakenly refer to free software as “open source”, when its code is not at all open source. I have also heard people in open education talk about how we can learn from open source, but I always felt cautious about this because the contexts are usually different.

Dell Firmware Updating under Linux