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Here we go again with the XGL

First it was Novell announcing its contribution of the Xgl graphics subsystem and the 'Compiz ' compositing manager to the X.org project. These enhancements open up a whole world of hardware acceleration, fancy animation, separating hardware resolution from software resolution, and more. As a result, Linux desktops will become more usable, end-user productivity will increase, and Linux is firmly positioned at the forefront of client computing technology.

Now Fedora jumps in and is doing something totally different than Novell. AIGLX is a project that aims to enable GL-accelerated effects on a standard desktop. We have a lightly modified X server (that includes a couple of extensions), an updated Mesa package that adds some new protocol support and a version of metacity with a composite manager.

And finally Mandriva hops on board with something that is going to be different than the other two. "We've have already started packaging Xorg 7.0 but we don't have any set of packages useful at this moment." On Xgl and Xegl: "Mandriva is not going to officially adopt the Novell Xgl server (Xglx). Instead, we are trying to push the Xegl[2] development.

I think we should lock all these developers in a room and nobody gets out until a standard is set!

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I dont understand anything you write dude!

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