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Gnome 3 Look & Feel

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Software

While I went into this with the attitude that I wanted to like and try this (I even installed it on my main computer), what I got disappointed me. It is not the workflow or the small things that annoy me. Quite the opposite, its because everything is so big. I have what you might call an average resolution on my screen (1366x768), and only the toolbars fill half the thing. Honestly I feel the design on the left is faar better.

But before I rant more, I tried changing the theme to be more suitable. While I was disappointed that the Gnome3 team was going for "One theme fits all" rather than easily customizable, and I got rather enfuriated by what seemed to be the reason behind a lot of the choices, like big ass menues so anyone with a bad touchpad can easily click them (Seriously, who makes a design choice based on "His hardware is bad so we must overcompensate for it"). After a couple of hours, I atleast got it looking more like the desktop I wanted.

rest here




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