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Breaking in a Kingston SSD

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Linux
Hardware

Solid state hard drives are all the rage these days due to their higher performance and decreased failure rates. Solid state drives store data in much the same manner as USB sticks. This eliminates the the weak link in the chain in data storage safety because the platter and arm design has been replaced with NAND flash memory. No moving parts mean less chance of mechanical failure and that translates to safer data storage. It also boosts the performance, runs cooler, and is more shock resistant. The only real drawback has been the increased price and smaller capacity when compared to mechancial drives - both of which are moving in favor of the consumer as time passes.

One of the brightest spots in this area is the Kingston SSDNow V100 drive kit. The Kingston drive kit is a complete upgrade package that contains a set of adapter brackets so one might install this 2.5 inch drive in a 3.5 inch bay, two sets of screws to attach the drive to brackets and the brackets to the case, a peripheral power connector to SATA adapter, a SATA data cable, and a cloning tool CD. This makes installation and upgrading computer drives a snap. The three year warranty is a plus as well. The model tested is the 128 GB version selling for less than 250 USD at popular online retailers such as amazon.com or tigerdirect.com.

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Re: Breaking in a Kingston SSD

It's great to see you picked one up! The more you use it, the more you are going to realize that you NEVER want to go without one ever again. Mark my words!

re: Breaking in a Kingston SSD

So do you need to use a lighter weight hard drive oil when you're breaking in those SSD's?

re: re: Breaking in a Kingston SSD

lolol... no the regular ole hard drive oil is fine. Big Grin

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