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Introduction to Open Source Image Tools

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GIMP

Whether you are moving to Ubuntu or just require an affordable (in this case free) alternative to Adobe Photoshop, you should be considering GIMP as your primary image editing tool

Short for GNU Image Manipulation Program, GIMP comes pre-installed with certain open source operating systems such as Ubuntu, and allows designed to help you crop images, resize and edit, convert between image formats and even create basic GIF animations.

Available for Windows and Mac as well, GIMP is most popularly used in Linux distros, and as such is one of the key aspects of our journey through the migration from the closed source, proprietary Windows to open source, open Linux.

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