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Interview with Alexander Zubov (Steel Storm: Burning Retribution)

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Interviews
Gaming

Alexander “motorsep” Zubov is the founder of Kot-in-Action Creative Artel, whose new independently produced game, Steel Storm: Burning Retribution, is set to be released this May. He took the time to answer a few questions about his project for me.

Entar: Tell us a little about your team and your project.

Alexander: Kot-in-Action Creative Artel(tm) is an international team, with it’s members scattered around the globe. The headquarters of the company are located in Texas. None of the members live in the vicinity from each other, therefore the communication happens by the means of the IRC, the e-mail and the forum. Currently, the core of the team consist of 3 people. The rest of the team are freelancers.

Steel Storm(tm) project was born shortly after we finished prototyping our first game, titled The Prophecy(tm), for QuakeExpo 2008. The amount of art assets for The Prophecy was staggering, we have been short handed in the art department and at that time we didn’t have required experience to take on a project of that magnitude. Therefore we decided to freeze Prophecy and start a smaller scale project. A new game was born.

Initially, it was suppose to be a very simple arcade shooter with top down view, but in time, the complexity of the project unfolded and the game became known as Steel Storm series.

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