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What next?

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Just talk

Yeah, continuing from where i left it off, the Linux journey got more interesting this year. 1st because i wanted a little more adventure and installed Arch. Later on, my motherboard requested for retirement by breaking down, and hence had to either resurrect or renovate it. I chose the latter.

Installing Arch, was intimidating when i did it on my old box. Venturing into a mouse-less world was a new thing and till i was at the end of the official Arch installation guide, i was skeptical about the whole idea. Once up and running with proper interface and stuff, the experience was better than that of Ubuntu, partly because I know what was, is and will be present in my system, and also coz my veteran system was able to satisfy my demands for a crisp freeze-less response.

Once my old box broke down, the upgraded (read:replaced) box added a load of enthusiasm. I had to install "se7en" for my bro to use and sat down to install Linux. Void of second thoughts, my choice was Arch, even though enormous resources were at disposal for any kinda home desktop system to hog. The initial intimidation was not to be found and I was instead looking forward to correct all the mistakes that I might have committed the 1st time.

I tried KDE and found it to be a feature-bloat for my necessity; Openbox couldn't demand enuf patience for all that is required to pimp it up. Finally, settled with XFCE for the balance it offers between features, add-ons, interface and bloat. My adventure finally ended with tweaking of conky and cairo-dock.

What have I learned in the process? Jus setting up my system. Now that my hardware and OS both are gonna be the same for atleast another 5yrs, what next?

I am a C programmer by practice and profession, learnt some shell scripting to use on cygwin in my Linux-deprived office. Now, I am in search of avenues to wet my hands and do some dirty work.

Lead Kindly Light.

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back on track

a little roaming around this site, and i find this wonderful page titled "Helpful Sites." by the time i skimmed through the titles in that page, I was sure that i was back on track.

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