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Microsoft's Skype acquisition may impact Linux users

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Linux
Microsoft
Software

After a week of rumors about Skype being heavily courted by buyers such as Google and Facebook, it looks like the winning bidder may be Microsoft.

According to a story the Wall Street Journal broke late Monday evening (and later confirmed early Tuesday morning), Microsoft has closed a nearly $8 billion deal for the popular voice-over-IP company.

This deal will represent a pretty big sea change for not only the VoIP sector, but also the broader Software as a Service (SaaS) industry. Microsoft has not gained a lot of ground in the cloud, with Bing still behind Google, and not much success reported for Office 360 in comparison to other cloud services like Google Docs, either. Getting a hold of Skype, though, would be a big brand-name acquisition for Microsoft and put it right into the middle of the cloud game.

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Also: Open Source alternatives for Skype

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