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Recommended Linux productivity software

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Software

After having read my Why I use original article that focused on operating systems, a reader named Julian contacted me and suggested that I write a new article about programs running on top of my systems. In other words, what kind of productivity software do I use daily for my work and recreations? What makes my selection of programs better or smarter than the rest? It's such a simple request, and yet quite useful. Not that I'm any kind of guru or anything, but you just may want to know what makes me tick.

I obliged Julian and wrote this article. It is limited to Linux, because this was the original request, if I recall the mail thread correctly. However, if you want to know more about recommended software in general, there's a whole bunch of articles that specialize in that; links further below. Now, let's examine my top choices, spread across ten typical categories.

rest here




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