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In this tutorial we are going to improve our website by tweaking out the .htaccess file. Why I wrote this article? Because on the net I have found many articles about this little beast, but every one of them dealt with a specific issue and not look at the overall usage of these files, or they are just too big when you need to do a thing in little time. So I’m trying to collect all the useful bits of data in a monolithic but slim tutorial, which will be updated as I collect more information. But first, let’s see what .htaccess file is…

Full Story.

Today the same cultural phenomenon seems to have been applied to the much revered Content Management System (CMS). For those of you who have been living under a rock for the last five years, the humble CMS provides a website engine that can be used to create a site without the need to wrap yourself up with HTML, CSS, scripting languages and small paper napkins with strange CSS workarounds scribed upon them. From early successes such as PHPNuke, CMSs have grown dramatically. A quick look at the CMS Matrix provides a head count of 527 CMSs at the time of writing. Yes, 527. Insane.

That Story.

System administration can be like sailing a ship. You must keep your engines running smoothly, keep your crew and the harbors notified and up to date and also maintain your Captain's log. You must keep your eye on the horizon for what is coming next. Two technologies have emerged over the past few years that could help keep you on course, wikis and blogs. This tutorial on TWiki and WordPress shows how wikis and blogs can be useful for system administration and documentation.

And That Story.



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