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Windows 8: it's too soon, Microsoft

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Microsoft

When software behemoth Microsoft released its Windows Vista platform in late 2006, organisations did their best to hold their noses and back away from the malodorous operating system.

This was despite the fact that almost all of the companies, government agencies and other institutions were still running Windows XP — an operating system first released in 2001, which had since received piles of patches, updates and retro-fits to bring it into the modern age. The problem was that, for all of its flaws, Microsoft's most popular operating system was relatively stable.

Vista, on the other hand, was not.

Following the Vista disaster, it took Microsoft three years for the company to fix its mistake and give birth to Windows 7, which the entire industry has embraced.

Now, the company looks to be making the same mistake all over again.

Also: Microsoft case: FSFE in European Court of Justice hearing




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