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So, What's the Deal With MicroSkype?

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Well, the Linux bloggers down at the blogosphere's Broken Windows Lounge had just barely finished chanting Skype's funeral dirge last week when word came that there might be reason to belt out another round.

Sure enough, turned out Skype has decided to cut its ties with the free and open source Asterisk telephony system, leaving Microsoft's (Nasdaq: MSFT) new VoIP offering with one fewer FOSSy friend to worry about supporting -- and leaving Asterisk users with one fewer option for Skype integration.

Readers with sharp hearing may have heard the indignant cries bellowing forth throughout the hills and dales of the Linux blogosphere last week; all others are surely hearing them now.

'Proof That Microsoft Can't Be Trusted'

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