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digiKam 2.0 beta review – the ultimate open source image editor

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Software

When it comes to tweaking and managing photos, few applications can rival digiKam. This everything-but-the-kitchen-sink software is designed to handle virtually every photographic task, from transferring and processing photos to organizing and sharing them. digiKam developers churn out new versions of the application at an impressive rate, and each new release brings a slew of bug fixes, improvements, and new features. The latest version 2.0 is no exception. Despite the modest point-one increase in version number, digiKam 2.0 brings several significant new features and a vast array of tweaks and fixes.

Let’s start with the seemingly minor additions called Colour Labels and Picks. As you might have guessed, the Color Labels feature allows you to mark photos in albums using colour labels. Better yet, each colour label has its own default keyboard shortcut, which speeds up the marking process. Colour Labels can come in handy in several situations. For example, you can use colour codes to triage incoming photos, marking them by relevance. You can also use colour labels to specify the privacy level for each photo, with the read labels assigned to private shots, yellow for snaps that can be shared with family and friends, and green for public photos.

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