Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

digiKam 2.0 beta review – the ultimate open source image editor

Filed under

When it comes to tweaking and managing photos, few applications can rival digiKam. This everything-but-the-kitchen-sink software is designed to handle virtually every photographic task, from transferring and processing photos to organizing and sharing them. digiKam developers churn out new versions of the application at an impressive rate, and each new release brings a slew of bug fixes, improvements, and new features. The latest version 2.0 is no exception. Despite the modest point-one increase in version number, digiKam 2.0 brings several significant new features and a vast array of tweaks and fixes.

Let’s start with the seemingly minor additions called Colour Labels and Picks. As you might have guessed, the Color Labels feature allows you to mark photos in albums using colour labels. Better yet, each colour label has its own default keyboard shortcut, which speeds up the marking process. Colour Labels can come in handy in several situations. For example, you can use colour codes to triage incoming photos, marking them by relevance. You can also use colour labels to specify the privacy level for each photo, with the read labels assigned to private shots, yellow for snaps that can be shared with family and friends, and green for public photos.

rest here

More in Tux Machines

Data indicates that Android picked up global market share from iOS last month

Tracking mobile web traffic, NetMarketShare computes the market share for mobile operating systems. Based on the data from last month, Android was able to widen its gap over iOS globally. Considering that the Apple iPhone 6s and Apple iPhone 6s Plus weren't launched until September 25th, the recently released phones accounted for a miniscule part of the data. The new models won't have a major effect on the results until the figures for this month are released. Read more

RapidDisk / RapidCache 3.4 now available.

RapidDisk is an advanced Linux RAM Disk which consists of a collection of modules and an administration tool. Features include: Dynamically allocate RAM as block device. Use them as stand alone disk drives or even map them as caching nodes to slower local disk drives. I pushed 3.4 into the mainline earlier this morning. Changes include:
  • Added ability to autoload RapidDisk volumes during module insertion.
  • Fixed bug in RapidDisk (volatile) volume size definition across 32 to 64 bit types.
  • Making use of BIT() macro in the driver.
  • Removed RapidDisk-NV support. It was redundant with the recently kernel integrated pmem code.
You can pull it from the git, yum, ZYpp & apt repos or download it from the SourceForge project page. To stay updated, you can follow the RapidDisk Google+ page.