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12 Paid Games for Linux Totally Worth the Price

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The response we got for our feature on rarely known commercial applications for Linux was simply overwhelming and some of those who enjoyed the article wanted us to do a similar feature on commercial games available for Linux. So here is it, a very neat collection of paid games for Linux worth exploring.

* Oil Rush is a real-time naval strategy game based on group control. It combines the strategic challenge of a classical RTS with the sheer fun of Tower Defence genre. OilRush was expected to be available by 2010 itself, but it didn't happen. OilRush RTS game for Linux is now available for pre order and you can expect a release very soon. Price: $19.95

* You should know by now that, we have a soft corner for simple, lightweight and addictive puzzle games for Linux. Puzzle Moppet is another game in that genre.

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