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A use for EFI

Filed under
Linux

Anyone who's been following anything I've written lately may be under the impression that I dislike EFI. They'd be entirely correct. It's an awful thing and I've lost far too much of my life to it. It complicates the process of booting for no real benefit to the OS. The only real advantage we've seen so far is that we can configure boot devices in a vaguely vendor-neutral manner without having to care about BIOS drive numbers. Woo.

But there is something else EFI gives us. We finally have more than 256 bytes of nvram available to us as standard. Enough nvram, in fact, for us to reasonably store crash output. Progress!

This isn't a novel concept.




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